R.E.

Subject leader

Miss Light is responsible for R.E. This means ensuring there is an ambitious curriculum set, supporting teachers to implement it through high-quality lessons and checking that everything is helping children to know more, remember more and do more.

If you would like more information in addition to that published on this page, please email:

p.light@oakfield.hants.sch.uk

Purpose of Study

RE is for all pupils in all schools, every pupil has a legal entitlement to RE. It is a necessary part of a ‘broad and balanced curriculum’ and must be provided for all registered pupils in state-funded schools in England, including those in the sixth form, unless withdrawn by their parents (or withdrawing themselves if they are aged 18 or over). This requirement does not apply to pupils below compulsory school age (although there are many examples of good practice of RE in nursery classes).

Schools are not obliged to provide R.E. to pupils who are under compulsory school age (section 80(2)(a) of the Education Act 2002), although there are many instances of good practice where R.E. is taught to these pupils.

Aims

  • Provide children with an understanding of the fundamental values and beliefs of six world religions - Christianity, Buddhism, Isalm, Hinduism, Judaism and Sikhism.

  • Provide children with a basic understanding of celebrations and festivals which are observed and celebrated as part of these religions.

  • Encourage children to ask questions, share their beliefs as well as respect those of others.

Oakfield's Approach

Intent

We are setting out to help our pupils be ...

  • Diverse, celebrating their own beliefs, values and cultures, as well as those of others.

  • Respectful, treating everyone with equality and fairness, regardless of their beliefs.

  • Passionate about their own beliefs, celebrations and values.

  • Curious, asking questions to help them to understand the beliefs of others more clearly.

Implementation

We will do this by ensuring ...

  • Pupils will learn about a wide range of world religions, values and cultures.

  • Children will be taught about equality and its importance.

  • Children will be taught about a diverse range of celebrations observed across the world.

  • Children will be taught how to enquire respectfully.

Impact

We will have made a difference when ...

  • Children will be able to talk about the fundamental beliefs of people who share our world.

  • Children will demonstrate tolerance, acceptance and fairness towards each other and those who share our world.

  • Children will be able to express why some celebrations are important to other people as well as those that are important to themselves.

  • Children will be able to discuss the core values and important events in the calendars of different world religions.

Threshold Concepts

These are our big takeaways called ‘threshold concepts’ - an overview of what we want pupils to know. They are the same for every year group and help us to ensure we build learning on the same ideas, that way we help children to be able to remember more meaningful connections rather than remembering isolated facts.


  1. Different people believe in different greater powers and live their lives according to this.

  2. My opinions are important and I should feel confident when sharing them with others. I should be able to explain my thinking. Other people might have opinions that are different to mine and this is normal. I should show respect and tolerance towards those with different viewpoints to my own. Other people will show me the same respect.

  3. Asking questions can help me to understand more about the world around me, including the beliefs, traditions, values and rituals of different cultures and religions.

  4. Different religions have different values although some share similar or the same values. These might be values which are also important to me and I might learn about them in different ways throughout my life.

  5. Different religions have values and ways of life. These affect the way that communities live their lives.


Progression on a Page ...

Here is an overview of what we expect children to be taught, know and do by the end of each year group.

Year R

  • Continue to develop positive attitudes about the differences between people.

  • Develop their sense of responsibility and membership of a community

  • See themselves as a valuable individual

  • Think about the perspectives of others.

  • Talk about members of their immediate family and community.

  • Name and describe people who are familiar to them.

  • Understand that some places are special to members of their family.

  • Recognise that people have different beliefs and celebrate special times in different ways.

  • Talk about the lives of people around them and their role in society.

  • Understand the past through settings, characters and events encountered in books read in class and storytelling.

  • Show sensitivity to their own and other’s needs.

Year 1

  • Children will begin to ask closed questions about different rituals and celebrations that are held by a variety of different religions.

  • They will be able to describe verbally some events within a festival and say what they like about this.

  • They will also begin to describe things that are good and evil, talk about why sharing is important in every day life and say what might be the same and what might be different about the way life events (eg birthdays) are celebrated in different cultures and families.

Year 2

  • Children will ask and discuss closed questions about different rituals and celebrations that are held by a variety of different religions.

  • They will be able to summarise the main events within a festival and say what they like and dislike about this.

  • They will also begin to describe why some parts of the festivals they are studying are important to the people who celebrate them. They will also be able to describe verbally examples of right and wrong, share their ideas about why love and collaboration is important in every day life.

  • They will begin to identify (with support) these themes in religious stories.

Year 3

  • In September 2021-22, Year 3 Children will complete the same R.E. Topics as Year 2 as they missed them last year. Children will still develop their questioning, enquiry and reasoning skills as below.

  • Children will begin to ask and discuss more open ended questions (with the use of question banks) about different rituals and celebrations that are held by a variety of different religions.

  • They will be able to summarise and explain some of the main events within a festival and say why they are important to the people who follow them. Children will begin to make links between events in religious stories and aspects / rituals associated with the different religious festivals.

Year 4

  • Children will be able to ask and discuss more open ended questions about different rituals and celebrations that are held by a variety of different religions and begin to compare them with those of other religions (with support).

  • They will be able to summarise and explain most of the main events within a festival and say why they are important to the people who follow them as well as discussing similarities in their own everyday lives.

  • Children will begin to make links between events in religious stories and aspects / rituals associated with the different religious festivals.

Year 5

  • Children will begin to ask and discuss more ‘thinking’ and ‘philosophical’ questions about different rituals and celebrations that are held by a variety of different religions.

  • They will be able to compare them with those of other religions and festivals within the same religions that they have learnt throughout KS1 and KS2 so far.

  • Children will also be able to consider other ways that they show different values which are important to particular religions in their own every day life.

Year 6

  • Children will be able to pose and discuss deep, ‘philosophical’ questions about events, stories, core beliefs and rituals associated with the different religions they have learnt throughout KS1 and KS2.

  • They will make links and compare different religious values, teachings and celebrations and consider aspects of these which they would adopt in their every day lives.

  • They will share their opinions clearly and evaluate why different religious values are important to the people who follow them.

Learning Overviews by Religion

Detailed progression in R.E.

1e - Threshold Concepts RE - new concepts.pdf

Right of Withdrawal

  • “All students are entitled to receive RE as part of a broad and balanced curriculum at school which promotes their spiritual, moral, social and cultural development” - Religious education in English schools: Non-statutory guidance 2010. However, the law gives parents/carers the right to withdraw their child(ren) from collective acts of worship and/or Religious Education lessons, in accordance with the 1988 Education Reform Act. At Oakfield, we respect that right.

  • In the UK, the law does not prescribe how religious education should be taught or organised in schools, only that schools should bear in mind that the way RE is taught should reflect the agreed syllabus of the Local Education Authority and the ethos of the school, as well as ensuring that students make good progress, learning about and from the world around them and that Teaching Standards are adhered to. At Oakfield, we believe our RE curriculum fulfils this criteria.

  • Parents have the right to choose whether to withdraw their child from RE without influence from the school, although a school should ensure parents or carers are informed of this right and are aware of the educational objectives and content of the RE syllabus. If students are withdrawn from RE, schools have a duty to supervise them, though not to provide additional teaching or to incur extra cost; suitable work relating to the child’s religious education should be provided by the parents/carers. Pupils will usually remain on school premises, unless the child is lawfully receiving religious education elsewhere.

  • Parents can only withdraw their child from RE, not other curriculum areas. For example, pupils can’t be withdrawn from a study of religious art in an art lesson or the study of evolution in science.

  • It is important to remember the contribution RE makes to the development of children and the promotion of Fundamental British Values.

  • If you wish to withdraw your child from RE, please arrange a meeting with Miss Light who will be able to support you.


What does the law say?

In order for a pupil to be withdraw, a school by law, must be satisfied:

  • "that the parent of the pupil desires him to receive religious education of a kind which is not provided in the school during the periods of time during which he is so excused"

  • "that the pupil cannot with reasonable convenience be sent to another maintained school where religious education of the kind desired by the parent is provided, and"

  • "that arrangements have been made for him to receive religious education of that kind during school hours elsewhere."