Year 2

English Overviews

Reading Overview

Year 2.pdf

Writing Overview

Writing 2.pdf

Hold a Sentence

Mathematics Overview & Support

We are proud to work with the Maths Hub for 2020 - 2022 to develop a matery approach when teaching mathematics.

Termly Overview

Key Instant Recall Facts (KIRFS)

Topics & Overviews

Muck, Mess & Mixtures

Topic Description

We’re warning you; this is going to get messy!

This half term, we’ll have a messy morning to investigate mixtures, from paint and toothpaste to jelly and shaving foam. We’ll enjoy the story of George’s Marvellous Medicine and write recipes, leaflets, lists and stories of our own. We’ll use our science skills to explore everyday materials, investigate soap products and understand why mixtures freeze and melt. We’ll learn how to measure using scales, measuring jugs and cylinders accurately. We’ll taste a wide variety of foods, learn about healthy eating and follow recipes to make some yummy treats including pizza and ice cream! Our artwork will also rely on our mixing skills. We’ll use marbling inks to make unusual patterns, create food landscapes inspired by Carl Warner, paint with ice cubes, model clay into exciting shapes and use a variety of materials to make mixed media collages.

At the end of our project, we’ll turn our classroom into a gallery and invite you to view our exhibition. We’ll arrange images from the project into a PowerPoint presentation and demonstrate our messy science investigations. We’ll also design and create our very own mud kitchen to play in. Yuck!

Help your child prepare for their project

Muck and mixtures can be messy and magical! Why not make a variety of fun recipes to reveal how mixtures can come together and change? Trifle, gooey cookies and bread would all be good to try. You could also invent a new soft drink. Mix, shake and stir a range of fruit juices, cordials and sparkling water together and taste each one. Pick the best and give it a groovy name. Alternatively, try making different bubble mixtures to see which make the biggest bubbles!

Muck, mess and mixtures topic overview.pdf
Muck mess and mixtures.pdf

Topic Overview

Knowledge Organiser

Beat, Band, Boogie

Topic Description

Left, right, left, right, here comes the marching band!

This half term, we’ll be stepping in time to the beat and learning all about music. We’ll listen to a music ensemble, identify pulse, rhythm and pitch, and move in time to the music. Leading and following instructions will help us make percussion instruments and we’ll also design our own. We’ll learn nursery rhymes including The Grand Old Duke of York and read the story of The Little Tin Soldier. Our bodies will turn into instruments as we try to master the art of body percussion. We’ll learn lots of new songs and write lyrics and tunes of our own. We’ll listen carefully to different sounds outdoors, test our sense of hearing and find out how far different sounds can travel.

You will be invited to our special music and movement event at the end of our project. Practice will hopefully make perfect when we perform our songs and dances with confidence.

Help your child prepare for their project

Music is a universal language. Why not listen to a wide variety of music together? Make a list of the music you have enjoyed, and share it with others. You could also watch clips of brass bands online and listen to the sounds of different instruments. Alternatively, take a ‘sound walk’ around your local area. Listen for vehicles, voices and natural sounds to appreciate the background noises we often take for granted.

Beat Band Boogie topic overview.pdf
Beat, Band, Boogie.pdf

Topic Overview

Knowledge Organiser

Magnificent Monarchs

Topic Description

In the Magnificent Monarchs project, your child will learn about English and British monarchs from AD 871 to the present day and consider how the power of the monarchy has changed over time. They will study six significant sovereigns; Alfred the Great, William the Conqueror, Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, Queen Victoria and the current monarch, Elizabeth II. Finally, they will choose which of the sovereigns that they have studied is the most significant.

Magnificent Monarchs overview.pdf
Magnificent Monarchs.pdf

Topic Overview

Knowledge Organiser

Wriggle & Crawl

Topic Description

Put on your coat and wellies and let’s head outside on a minibeast hunt.

This term, we’ll head to a wetland or woodland to identify minibeasts in their natural habitat. We’ll write a guide book for other children to use on a minibeast hunt, draw sketch maps of our minibeast hunting area and create minibeast stories and poems. Heading out into the local area, we’ll explore trees and bushes to see what lives there, investigate how far and how fast a snail can travel and create a minibeast habitat of our own. We’ll draw delicate sketches of minibeasts, make models from a variety of materials and use microscopes to observe minibeasts up close. Our ICT skills will help us create a minibeast animation and we’ll observe a beehive through live webcam footage.

A special assembly at the end of our project will give us the chance to share our knowledge. We’ll create a PowerPoint presentation, use scientific vocabulary to explain what we have learnt, display our artwork and perform our minibeast poems with musical accompaniment.

Help your child prepare for their project

Minibeasts are fascinating. Why not have a minibeast hunt around your local area? Look out for different minibeasts, take close-up photos and use an app or spotting book to identify any unknown creatures. Alternatively, visit a local museum to see if they have any insect specimens on display. Huge moths, colourful butterflies and armoured beetles are all amazing to see. You could also invent minibeasts of your own. Draw, paint or make models of new minibeasts, then give them a name and describe their special features.

Wriggle and Crawl topic overview.pdf
knowledge-organiser-a4.pdf

Topic Overview

Knowledge Organiser

The Scented Garden

Topic Description

Let’s tiptoe through the tulips together and discover the sights, sounds and smells of the garden.

This half term, we’ll visit a florist’s shop or a garden centre. We’ll find out how to look after plants, ask the experts questions and appreciate the flowers. We’ll write an information book about plants, follow instructions, enjoy the story of Jack and the Beanstalk and write stories of our own. Discovering our green fingers will be fun when we plant and tend a pizza garden of herbs. We’ll also learn about the different parts of a plant and create our own ‘planting and growing’ action rhyme. Our senses will help us describe and sort a range of smells and we’ll make beautifully scented products. We’ll look closely at a wide variety of plants, create detailed, observational drawings and press real flowers to use in collages.

At the end of our project, we will have become plant experts! We’ll create a presentation about plants, share the information books that we have made and design a fantasy garden.

Help your child prepare for their project

Gardens are so special and are an excellent place to visit together. Why not take close-up photographs of flowers and use a plant identification app or spotting guide to find the name of each plant? You could also buy some wild flower seeds and watch them grow. Alternatively, bake recipes containing fragrant herbs and spices! Cheese and chive scones, cinnamon biscuits and lavender cake are all delicious!

Scented Garden topic overview (1).pdf
Scented Garden.pdf

Topic Overview

Knowledge Organiser

Coastline

Topic Description

In the Coastline project, your child will use maps to learn about the location of the world’s seas and oceans and keys to learn about map symbols. They will also find out about the directions on a compass. They will learn about the human and physical features of a coastline, including the effects of erosion and how to stay safe when visiting the coast. They will have the opportunity to learn about the work of the RNLI, what happened to the SS Rohilla and about the coastal town of Whitby, including how Captain Cook is linked to the town. They will research the tourism industry and consider what features make a place a successful tourist destination.

Coastine topic overview.pdf
Coastline.pdf

Topic Overview

Knowledge Organiser

Religious Education - Love To Celebrate!

We look at six celebrations from across the major religions of the world.

Sikhism

Anand Karaj

Before a Sikh wedding, the bride and groom may have a Kurmai engagement ceremony and receive a ring. Gifts are exchanged and many special preparations are made in the days and weeks before the wedding.

On the morning of the wedding, the bride and groom's family meet at the Gurdwara and share food before the ceremony. The Sikh wedding ceremony is called the Anand Karaj. The Granthi leading the service recites prayers and hymns and the bride takes hold of a scarf that the groom wears over his shoulder. Four wedding hymns, called Lavans are said and then sung. After each Lavan, the couple walk round the holy book, the Guru Granth Sahib, which is witnessing their marriage. They also bow to the Guru Granth Sahib to show they agree with the readings. The Lavans act as the binding promises or vows.

Many Sikh weddings are followed by a reception where there is plenty of fun, food and dancing.

Islaam

Jumu'ah

Jumu’ah are Friday prayers. Before Jumu’ah, many Muslims wash, put on perfume or aftershave and dress in clean clothes. Just after lunchtime, worshippers meet at the mosque to say special prayers and listen to a talk by the Imam. The importance of saying Friday prayers is mentioned in the Qur’an and Muhammad called Friday the best day.

Christianity

Christmas

Christmas is a Christian festival that marks the birth of Jesus Christ, over 2000 years ago. It is celebrated by billions of people around the world. Christians call the period before Christmas, Advent. The word Advent means 'coming' and is the time when Christians wait to celebrate the arrival of baby Jesus and think about the second coming of Jesus that they believe will happen in the future.

At Christmas time, Christians might attend special church services, remember the nativity story, buy gifts for loved ones, eat special food and spend time with family.

Christmas is also hugely popular secular celebration and traditions and stories that don't mark the birth of Jesus are popular.





Buddhism

Losar

The Tibetan Buddhist New Year holiday, Losar, starts on the first day of the first month of the Tibetan calendar, which is usually in February.

The celebrations last between three and 15 days and are a mixture of early Bon traditions and later Buddhist traditions. Tibetan Buddhists may perform rituals and dances to ward off evil spirits, present offerings to Buddha's shrine and hang up new prayer flags during Losar.

Losar is also a family time when people clean their houses, wear new clothes, come together to eat, share in the traditions of the festival and spend time together.

Judaism

Hanukkah

Hanukkah is the Jewish Festival of Lights that is celebrated every autumn in November or December. The festival celebrates the victory of Judah Maccabee and his Jewish followers over the Syrian Emperor Antiochus and the miracle of the lamp, which burned for eight days in the regained temple in Jerusalem, even though there was only enough oil for one day's light.

Lighting the Hanukkiah, playing the dreidel game and eating fried foods are Hanukkah traditions that help Jews to remember the story of the Maccabees, the lamp in the temple and the importance of religious freedom.






Hinduism

Navratri

Navratri is celebrated for nine nights and 10 days. Hindus worship a different form of the mother goddess Durga every day, including Lakshmi (the goddess of good fortune and wealth) and Saraswati (the goddess of wisdom). In India, clay statues of Durga are placed in homes, temples and street shrines during the festival. On the tenth day (Dussehra) the statues are paraded in the streets and put into water to disintegrate.

Navratri is a time for new, colourful clothes, good food, dancing and families. However, it is also a time to fast, worship the goddesses quietly and take part in puja ceremonies every day. Navratri is also celebrated as a harvest festival. Many Hindus plant nine different grains at the beginning of the festival to celebrate a good harvest.

P.S.H.E - Personal Social Health Education (Including Relationships & Sex Education)

We follow six key themes in P.S.H.E. that are taught at the same time across the school, below is the specific theme covered.

Being Me In My World

  • Hopes and fears for the year

  • Rights and responsibilities

  • Rewards and consequences

  • Safe and fair learning

environment

  • Valuing contributions

  • Choices

  • Recognising feelings

Celebrating Difference

  • Assumptions and

stereotypes about gender

  • Understanding bullying

  • Standing up for self and

others

  • Making new friends

  • Gender diversity

  • Celebrating difference and

remaining friends

Dreams & Goals

  • Achieving realistic goals

  • Perseverance

  • Learning strengths

  • Learning with others

  • Group co-operation

  • Contributing to and sharing

success

Healthy Me

  • Motivation

  • Healthier choices

  • Relaxation

  • Healthy eating and nutrition

  • Healthier snacks and sharing

food

Relationships

  • Different types of family

  • Physical contact boundaries

  • Friendship and conflict

  • Secrets

  • Trust and appreciation

  • Expressing appreciation for special relationships

Changing Me

  • Cycles in nature

  • Growing from young to old

  • Increasing independence

  • Differences in female and male bodies (correct terminology)

  • Assertiveness

  • Preparing for transition